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PLEASE JOIN US FOR FREE PUBLIC SCREENINGS OF

“MOST LIKELY TO SUCCEED”

FOLLOWED BY A COLLECTIVE CONVERSATION

ABOUT WHAT EACH OF US CAN DO

TO HELP EVOLVE OUR LEARNING AND

PARENTING CULTURE WITH THE TIMES

 

upcoming dates & times

REDWOOD CITY LIBRARY, SATURDAY, AUGUST 22, 2015, 1:45PM

PLEASANTON LIBRARY, MONDAY, AUGUST 24, 2015, 3:15PM

FREMONT LIBRARY, SATURDAY, AUGUST 29, 2015, 10:45AM

LOS ALTOS LIBRARY, SUNDAY, AUGUST 30, 2015, 1:45PM

 

free and open to everyone

RSVP HERE

 

hosted by

GIRLS INNOVATE!

 

sponsored by

UYEN & CHINAM KRY

ANN SAPONARA

FARIDA RAHMAN

MEENU GUPTA & MUKUL AGARWAL

AIMEE & BILLY CHOW

KIM FREITAS

DEEPALI JAIN & ANAND BAGGA

(Girls Innovate! volunteers and local families)

 

Synopsis:

For most of the last century, entry-level jobs were plentiful, and college was an affordable path to a fulfilling career. That world no longer exists. This feature-length documentary examines the history of education, revealing the growing shortcomings of our school model in todayʼs innovative world.

Screened at the 2015 Sundance Film Festival, this documentary focuses on High Tech High, a school in San Diego that is rethinking in entirety the experience of school. As we follow students, parents and teachers through a truly unorthodox school experience, we are forced to consider what sort of educational environment is most likely to succeed in the 21st century.

Film website: www.mltsfilm.org

“It quickly becomes clear that Most Likely to Succeed sees very little point in looking at education reform from a political standpoint. This is a film about parents, teachers and, most importantly, students, namely the grassroots participants that make up all the statistics we hear about on the nightly news. We see their victories and defeats, their excitement and anxiety.”

– The Hollywood Reporter

Run time: 89 minutes (followed by conversation among participants). Light refreshments will be served. Families, parents, youths, teens are all invited.

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From the Film Team:

“Two years ago, if you’d asked my wife and me to describe the ideal school for our two kids, I’d have probably said, ‘the school that will get them into the best college.’ If you pressed me to get more specific about the curriculum or what the teachers would be like, I would have probably cited some school with the highest test scores. I knew our nation’s schools were less than ideal, but I attributed their shortcomings to a general laziness, which caused us to trail China and India in math and science scores. As a result, I was sympathetic to the notion that the school day ought to be lengthened, more homework ought to be required, and teachers and administrators ought to be held accountable for poor test scores.

Three years ago, I met Ted Dintersmith, who in turn sent me a copy of Tony Wagner’s book The Global Achievement Gap. Over time, I started to realize that our school system, and the ways we assess it, have become obsolete. But after filming in well over one hundred classrooms across the U.S. and speaking extensively with people like Ted, Tony, Thomas Friedman of the NY Times, Sal Khan of Khan Academy, Laszlo Bock of Google and Sir Ken Robinson, my eyes began to open to what school could and should be.

I wanted to curse all of them as I can’t express what a helpless feeling it was to be making this movie and then dropping my own kids off at a school I was now convinced was wasting their time. I can’t think of an issue more pressing or more personal than education.”

– Greg Whiteley, Director, Writer, Producer

“I spent my career in the world of innovation. And now I’m immersed in education, having visited hundreds of schools in the past five years. Innovation is the proverbial two-edged sword. On the one hand, it will create many opportunities for innovative young adults. But it will eliminate millions of standard, routine jobs — and the 21st Century will be brutal for anyone leaving school trained to follow instructions and memorize content. I feel acute urgency in getting the message to students, parents, teachers, and school leaders that millions of futures are on the line. I hope the film conveys this urgency, while offering an inspiring view of what our students, and teachers, can do under the right conditions.

I’m passionate about this in part because I grew up in a family that struggled from week to week to make ends meet. I benefited from an education system that made sense for the times, and that helped level the playing field. That education system no longer exists. We owe it to future generations to provide them with an education that elevates their potential. And for those who might wonder if I’m doing this for personal gain, I’m donating any proceeds I get from the film to The Future Project, a non-profit transforming high schools in our inner cities.”

– Ted Dintersmith, Executive Producer

Film website: www.mltsfilm.org